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Does the word "segregate" have any undesired side context to US speakers?

These are examples:

Segregate configuration from the code.
A task is about test segregation.

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    Absolutely not. It has no unintented connotation at all in that context. – P. E. Dant Jul 7 '17 at 4:55
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    Separate would be a better word. – Rob K Jul 7 '17 at 18:49
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The words "segregation", "segregate", "desegregation" and "desegregate" will all bring up memories in many older Americans. In the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's these words were heard frequently, almost always in the context of racial separation. For a great many Americans that was the only context with which they were familiar. "Segregation" was used without qualification to mean racial separation George Wallace.

In the cited examples:

Segregate configuration from the code.

A task is about test segregation.

the words "segregate" and "segregation" will probably not stir undesired memories today.

However, care should be used in using these words except in clear context, especially when communicating with older Americans.

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