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It indicated that small size animal fed preferentially on milk and secondarily on fruits, medium size animal fed preferentially on rice and secondarily on wheat and large size animals fed preferentially on wheat and secondarily on rice.

Is it grammatically correct to use three times preferentially and three times secondarily in one sentense

  • @BobRodes Note the rollback. This questioner has now asked 7 questions, and in 6 has misspelled the same word, despite being informed of the error multiple times. Since his response to being told about this is always along the lines of "thank you!", it is not clear that the OP can comprehend the comments. Leaving the missellings in place and pointing them out may get his attention eventually. – P. E. Dant Jul 20 '17 at 2:11
  • If you can understand this comment, please tell us what your dictionary tells you about the word sentense. Thank you, @Hinli . – P. E. Dant Jul 20 '17 at 2:14
  • @P.E.Dant Either that, or the missellings are due to monumental stubbornness. – BobRodes Aug 9 '17 at 3:10
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I would start with *In order of preference..."

In order of preference, it indicated that small size animal fed on milk then on fruits, medium size animal (fed) on rice and then on wheat and large size animals (fed) on wheat and then on rice.

() words are optional.

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Yes, it's fine to do that, particularly when explaining things like this, which is obviously summary data from a scientific experiment. Technical and scientific language strives to be clear and accurate, and is quite happy to be wordy if those goals are accomplished. The explanation of the results is entirely clear, and using different words to avoid monotony would make it less so.

Some corrections: all of your references to animal need to be in the plural: animals. Also, in this particular case I would also use the "serial comma" (the comma preceding and in the final member of a list):

It indicated that small size animals fed preferentially on milk and secondarily on fruits, medium size animals fed preferentially on rice and secondarily on wheat, and large size animals fed preferentially on wheat and secondarily on rice.

Whether or not to use the serial comma is a matter of style: one style manual will say to use it and another will say not to. However, it is always recommended to avoid ambiguity in complex lists, especially where some or all of the items in the last include the word and. Your phrase "preferentially ... and secondarily," which occurs in each item in your list, suggests that the serial comma is to be recommended.

  • @Hinli You are most welcome. – BobRodes Jul 7 '17 at 7:43

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