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Here is the context:

These pictures had me recall so many memories. Father, you have been missed and I missed all those days that I had spend with you. Probably I was the happiest kid that time, Still happy but not as happier as I was when my dad was live.

Can the word "had" be used synonymously (that is, interchangeably) with "made"?

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    "These pictures made me recall so many memories. Father, I miss you and miss all those days that I spent with you. I was probably happiest at that time. I'm still happy but not as happy as I was when my dad was alive. Rest in peace, Father. I miss the whole family. I can't wait for the wedding so that I can retake all these pictures again." Commented Jul 12, 2017 at 17:37
  • Good question in terms of the distinctions it forces you to make. To "have" someone do something does mean to make them do it, but the agent of "have" in this sense can't be an inanimate object. I would say that "have" in this sense most literally means "arrange for it to be done", which clearly demands a person as an agent. Hence, the pictures can make you feel something, but they can't have you feel something. Oddly enough, though, they can "have you __ing something": "Those pictures had me laughing." If I get my head around this before someone else does I'll make an answer out of it. Commented Jul 12, 2017 at 20:43
  • In a word, no. The construction "These pictures had me recall so many memories" may be an attempt to use to have in the sense of to cause ("Have him come to the interview a 5", e.g.) but its use in this context is not idiomatic. Commented Jul 12, 2017 at 20:44

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Interchangeably? No.

Yes, the structure "to have [someone] do [something]" can mean "to make [someone] do [something]":

I had him run down to the store to get us some beer.

however, there are differences in nuance. "Make" is much stronger and implies some kind of coercion, as if there are consequences for not doing what is asked. Example:

She had me clean up the garage.
She made me clean up the garage.

Both imply I didn't want to clean the garage, but "had" suggests I did it (somewhat) voluntarily, while "made" suggests it was involuntary.

As Luke Sawczak suggests in his comment, while an inanimate object can certainly make you feel something, we don't say that it can have you feel something.

(Yes): That movie was so sad, it made me cry.
(No): That move was so sad, it had me cry.

However, using "have" is fine if you use the progressive:

The movie was so sad it had me crying.

The comedian had the audience laughing so hard they couldn't breathe.

Otherwise there are various other grammatical errors in your example. One possible edit:

These pictures had me remembering so many things. Father, you have been missed. I miss all those days that I spent with you. That was probably the happiest time in my life. I am still happy but not as happy as I was when my dad was alive.

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