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I was listening to episode 27 Good Advise of the ESL Podcast hosted by Dr. Jeff McQuillan. A woman was talking about her experience at the movies the previous weekend. She saw someone looking like her co-worker who had not been pulling her weight to finish the report they had to do very soon. She had been looking forward to the movie but her mood completely changed thinking of the report she hated to do. Then she said "Where did all of that thinking and worrying get me? Nowhere".

I did not understand, so I tried googling and came across this song on youtube titled "Where did it get me?"(link to the song). So I guess "where did something get me" means "why I am feeling upset/frustrated/sad"? Pls help me with this. Thx in advance.

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Where did it get me? just means What did I gain from it? or What good did that do? We basically use it when we are wondering if our actions, thoughts etc. were right or useful in any way. It can signify introspection, regret and yes, frustration, depending on the context.

In the context of the example, the woman wonders what good came of thinking of her co-worker and the report. The answer was none, as her experience at the movies was ruined. She regrets worrying about work and ruining her enjoyment. She is also being introspective.

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"Get" is often used with respect to traveling to a physical location. For example, one might say "I need to get to the store" to mean that they intend to go to the store.

"Where did it get me?" is akin to asking "what is the location to which I have travelled?" In the examlpe you provide, it is used as a metaphore. The character is comparing traveling to personal gain. The character says she did not "get" anywhere (she did not travel anywhere), by which she means that she did not gain anything from worrying.

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