3

The sentence:

Probably, after hearing him speak in English, they allowed him to enter in the pub.

So, can I use speaking in place of speak?

  • 1
    In this instance, the gerund-participle could be substituted for the infinitive. – P. E. Dant Jul 15 '17 at 21:24
  • 1
    @user55697 You should say "enter the pub," NOT "enter IN the pub." – Gustavson Jul 15 '17 at 22:18
  • When gerund participle could be substituted for infinitive @ pe dant – user55697 Jul 15 '17 at 22:40
  • When? In the sentence in your question. Or do I misunderstand? – P. E. Dant Jul 16 '17 at 1:48
  • @user55697 there is no rule; when a gerund may be substituted depends on which verb is being used; when a gerund might be substituted depends on style issues, including the context. – green_ideas Jul 16 '17 at 2:42
2

Yes you can - either of these work:

Probably, after hearing him speak in English, they allowed him to enter the pub.

or

Probably, after hearing him speaking in English, they allowed him to enter the pub.

(Note that in both cases I dropped the "*in" from the final clause, is it is not correct)

  • What's the difference in meaning between the two sentences? – userr2684291 Jul 17 '17 at 15:39
  • 1
    Good question @userr2684291. The meaning is almost the same. In the first one "they" might have "heard him speak" just once and it could be short. The second one implies that the "speaking" is going on for some time, and perhaps "they" just overheard it. – brendan Jul 19 '17 at 17:45

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