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I wonder if I can use "the result of which" in a sentence.

My sentence is as follows:

"John lacks the ability to focus for a long period of time, the result of which is reflected in the poor performance"

I would like to retain the part "reflected in the poor performance".

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    You could strike out the result of: "John lacks the ability to focus for a long period of time which is reflected in his poor performance". You could be more direct: "John lacks the ability to focus for a long period of time which is the cause of his poor performance". – whanrott Jul 14 '17 at 11:02
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This is absolutely grammatically correct. It feels a bit wordy to me and very formal. If you are using it in an academic paper or something similarly formal, I think it is fine. Otherwise, maybe trade it for

John's lack of ability to focus is reflected in his poor performance.

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