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can you help me with these sentenses please:

  1. "He has done very well overnight." - Does it mean that the night has just finished and he did very well overnight?

  2. "I have done two long days at work" - Does it mean that i have just finished work and i did two days there

  3. It has been very hot today - Does it mean that the day has just finished and it was very hot, or the day hasn't finished yet, or it is very hot during the whole day and it is still hot

My current understanding is that i can use present perfect this way: 1. I have been on a holiday in the last year - I was in a holiday in September 2 I have been on a holiday for two weeks - I am still on a holiday 3 I have been on a holiday for two weeks and i look fantastic. - I have just returned

Can i say "i have been better lately" does it meen that i have been doing better lately in comparison with " I have been better"?

  • For (3), all of the above. "It has been very hot today." Either the day has just finished and it was very hot (and it may or may not have cooled down now), or it's still the middle of the day but it's been very hot so far. – Peter Shor Jul 16 '17 at 13:44
  • You have it all correctly, except that I'd say 'better lately' compares with some time before 'lately' when I was not feeling well. – Yosef Baskin Jul 16 '17 at 13:45
  • Thank you for helping me. I wonder, when you use present perfect continious with present results, does the result itself imply that the action has just finished, as in this case - "I have been cleaning the car, and now the car is clean" - so i think that you should mention a result, or the result to be clear from the context, to imply that the action has finished? – Viktor Dimitrov Jul 16 '17 at 14:18
  • I have cleaned the car. I have just cleaned the car. I have just finished cleaning the car. Why use present perfect continuous if you want to imply that the action has finished? Are you trying to match the verb forms in your native language? – Peter Shor Jul 16 '17 at 14:26
  • No, i have read this in a grammar manual as an example of present perfect continious when the action has recently finished. There are other examples : I've been playng squash and i need a shower.( this one is from "advanced grammar in use", the previous one is from Cambridge Dictionary website - the exact sentence is "I've just been cleaning the car" and there is onother one "It's been snowing" when you see that the ground is covered by snow. – Viktor Dimitrov Jul 16 '17 at 14:59
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The present perfect usually denotes something that has just been completed, but, in the case of 'It has been very hot today,' it can mean, 'I has been very hot today so far.' The fact that it's the perfect aspect means that it may or may not continue to be hot.

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"He has done very well overnight." - Does it mean that the night has just finished and he did very well overnight?

Yes

"I have done two long days at work" - Does it mean that i have just finished work and i did two days there

Yes

This construct (both examples) can also express that the event has happened before at some point in the past, in general, or under certain circumstances.

He has done very well overnight when the weather is warm, so he will be content when summer finally arrives

Meaning: In general, under the specified circumstances, he has done very well. This may have occurred months ago, during the previous summer

I have done two long days at work, but the job remains incomplete. I will need to return tomorrow to finish the job.

In this case, saying "have done" instead of "did" two long days, reflects that the event has not entirely concluded, even though the two long days may have taken place a week ago. This usage is similar to the example from your next question.

It has been very hot today - Does it mean that the day has just finished and it was very hot, or the day hasn't finished yet, or it is very hot during the whole day and it is still hot

Any of these could be correct, because the event referred to may be the heat of the day (as measured by a thermometer), the sensation of feeling hot, or a state/activity which resulted in feeling hot. Possibilities include: the day just ended and it was hot (the temperature was high); the day has just ended and it felt hot (because the temperature was high); the state/activity (e.g., working in the sun) has just ended, and it was hot (performing the activity resulting in feeling hot). A change in state/activity may occur before, during, or after the end of the day. Thus, it is possible that the the temperature was high during the day and is still high now, but the subject no longer feels hot because the activity has ended.

My current understanding is that i can use present perfect this way: 1. I have been on a holiday in the last year - I was in a holiday in September 2 I have been on a holiday for two weeks - I am still on a holiday 3 I have been on a holiday for two weeks and i look fantastic. - I have just returned

That is correct.

Can i say "i have been better lately" does it meen that i have been doing better lately in comparison with " I have been better"?

These phrases can have different meanings:

I have been better lately: I was not feeling/doing well previously, but now I am feeling/doing well. I started feeling/doing better some time in the recent past, and this has continued to the present.

I have been better: The meaning depends on context and vocal inflection, because, without further information, the timing of events is ambiguous. The intended meaning could be that I am feeling/doing better now than in the past (i.e., I have been better lately), or that I have felt/done better in the past than in the present (i.e., I am feeling/doing not at all well right now).

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