1

I have the following three sentences:

1/ We will show what is the relation of this parameter to other existing properties.

2/ We will show what the relation of this parameter is to other existing properties.

3/ We will show what the relation of this parameter to other existing properties is.

I think that 2 is wrong. I strongly prefer 1/ but I do not know if it is correct. 3 is surely correct but it sounds cumbersome.

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  • The two words "what is" juxtaposed is always a question, so 1 must be wrong. I prefer 2. I think this question is best answered on ELL. – Andrew Leach Jul 18 '17 at 9:41
  • That best option might be to leave out those two words altogether: We will show the relation of this parameter to other existing properties. – J.R. Jul 18 '17 at 9:59
  • @AndrewLeach: no, 1 and 2 are licensed by extraposition. – Colin Fine Jul 18 '17 at 10:48
  • @ColinFine It may be "licensed" but I think in that case it should at least be mentioned that it is stilted to the point of inadmissibility. – Andrew Leach Jul 18 '17 at 11:07
1

All are grammatical.

3) is the form given by the normal rule of inversion; but is very awkward.

The other two are both allowed by heavy clause extraposition. I find 2) to be the clearest.

0

When showing someone something, "what is" is implied in the showing. No need to specifically indicate it.

"We will show the relation[ship] of this parameter to other existing parameters."

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