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This question already has an answer here:

Example:

Mark, with whom you spoke at the party, will be joining us.

or is it

Mark, with whom you spoke with at the party, will be....

marked as duplicate by Andrew, M.A.R., P. E. Dant, user178049, Varun Nair Jul 19 '17 at 5:58

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Mark, with whom you spoke at the party, will be joining us. is correct. The extra with is ungrammatical. You may also hear the common but technically incorrect Mark, who you spoke with at the party, will be joining us., but notice that even in that incorrect form, the word with is used only once.

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    But, "Mark, whom you spoke with at the party ..." would offend some pedants but most would consider valid. It has no surplus words and the meaning is clear. Not saying it's better than "with whom you spoke". – Jay Jul 18 '17 at 15:35
  • @Jay - but even that form only uses with once, which was the main error in the querent's sentence. – Jeff Zeitlin Jul 23 '17 at 23:30
  • Oh, absolutely, no disagreement there. – Jay Jul 24 '17 at 1:35

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