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I have written a sentence by using participle clause

Any contribution cannot be erased from the mind, therefore being essential for being successful

But my teacher is saying that "therefore being essential for being successful" is not correct.

I have read that I can connect two sentences together having the same subjects:

  1. Any contribution cannot be erased from the mind
  2. Therefore, any contribution is essential for being successful

So to me, my sentence was correct since the two sentences had the same subjects. I suppose that using a conjunctive adverb like 'therefore', 'hence', or 'thus' with the participle clause can be a reason for him to mark this incorrect. Am I right?

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    Even in the sentence that you suggrst as an alternative, using "any contribution" twice, it is not clear what you are trying to state. Can you provide some context and/or explanation? Jul 26, 2017 at 21:27
  • Please, please fix your punctuation. Also, check your grammar. Thanks.
    – Lambie
    Mar 13, 2022 at 17:15
  • It's hard to see what the point is of keeping around such an incomprehensible question. It is far more likely to confuse than help.
    – Stuart F
    Apr 21, 2023 at 18:34

3 Answers 3

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[A]ny contribution cannot be erased from the mind, therefore being essential for being successful.

This is unnatural.

You could try

Any contribution cannot be erased from the mind and therefore is essential for success.

This means

Any contribution cannot be erased from the mind.

Any contribution is essential for success.

The verbs are parallel, unlike the use of being.

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Due to the lack of context, it took me a very long time to determine what you were trying to say:

Any contribution cannot be erased from the mind, (the contribution) therefore being essential for being successful

This might be correct, I'm not sure. Certaintly awkward. An idiomatic way to say this is:

Any contributions, then, cannot be forgotten, rendering them essential for success.

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The problem is not the conjunctive adverb therefore; it is the use of the word being in a participle clause. When you use the form "being + adjective" at the beginning of a participle clause, it is used to replace because/since/as.

Any contribution cannot be erased from the mind, therefore being essential for being successful.

Any contribution cannot be erased from the mind, therefore because it is essential for being successful.

Any contribution cannot be erased from the mind, therefore as it is essential for being successful.

Any contribution cannot be erased from the mind, therefore since it is essential for being successful.

Do you see how therefore collides with the because/as/since wording? Now try it without the word "therefore".

Any contribution cannot be erased from the mind, because it is essential for being successful.

We should remove the comma in this version, but use the being form and it becomes correct:

Any contribution cannot be erased from the mind, being essential for being successful.

Using being twice in the same clause is wordy and awkward. It might be better as:

Any contribution cannot be erased from the mind, being essential for success.

If you want to convey the sense of the continuous tense instead, there are many ways to do that. For example:

Any contribution cannot be erased from the mind, being essential for lasting success.

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