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Astronomers all over the world will be observing the eclipse.

This sentence is from "the Oxford Advance Learners Dictionary''. The fact I want to know is ''whether I can use ''all over the world'' with singular countable noun'', for example, ''There is no place all over the world where football is not played''.

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No, you can't.

There is no place anywhere in the world where football is not played.

or

There is no place in the world where football is not played.

Affirmation:

Football is played all over the world.

You can remember this by thinking "all over the world = everywhere".

Everywhere and anywhere mean different things.

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    In a Provençal hill town hill town beseiged by Brits in caravans, I saw my favorite English language sign: NO PARKING ALL OVER THE PLACE – P. E. Dant Jul 27 '17 at 1:17
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The fact I want to know is whether I can use 'all over the world' with singular countable noun [sic].

Yes, you can.

A mum's love note to her baby has been reproduced by nearly 100 strangers - all over the world.

The handwritten message from Aimee Crook, 20, to her son Leo has already appeared in multiple countries - including America, Canada, Mexico, Australia, Egypt and France.

source

However, in the OP's sample sentence, There is no place all over the world where football is not played the term "football" is used as an example of a singular countable noun. The sport called football is uncountable, while the round (soccer) or oval ball (American football) is countable.

  1. My mom buys me footballs from all over the world. (plural countable noun)
  2. I have a football that has traveled all over the world. (singular uncountable noun)

    Another example of usage, taken from the BBC website

The rainbow flag is a symbol for gay pride all over the world.

This can be changed to

  • All over the world, the rainbow flag is the symbol of gay pride.
  • The rainbow flag all over the world is the symbol of gay pride.
  • The rainbow flag all over the world symbolizes gay pride.

TRomano's answer addresses the grammaticality of the OP's sample sentence very well, so there's no point in my repeating it.

  • But "from all over the world" is not quite the same as "all over the world" and "that has traveled all over the world" is a relative clause in which there is no singular noun being directly modified by "all over the world". People all over the world look up at the moon. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 27 '17 at 9:32
  • @Tᴚoɯɐuo I don't think my answer deserved a downvote, I answered the OP's specific question, whereas you corrected the grammar in his sample sentence and pointed out that there is a difference in meaning between "everywhere" and "anywhere". But have it your way. By all means post another comment, as many users for some reason, feel the need to have the last word. – Mari-Lou A Jul 27 '17 at 11:34
  • Isn't OP is asking whether the phrase all over the world can immediately follow the noun in question as a post-modifier? ("astronomers all over the world...no place all over the world") – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 27 '17 at 11:40
  • With respect to your pride example, what does all over the world modify? A single noun, or the entire predicate "the rainbow flag is a symbol for gay pride"? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 27 '17 at 12:48
  • And isn't football a red herring? The singular countable noun in question is (no) place. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 27 '17 at 12:53

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