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I want to combine the following sentences into one sentence.

Nokia was followed by Motorola and Ericsson. Motorola was on the second rank and Ericsson was on the third rank.

How should I construct the sentence? Mentioned below are the possible choices that I thought.

a. Nokia was followed by Motorola and Ericsson, all of which were on the second and the third rank, respectively.

b. Nokia was followed by Motorola and Ericsson, all of which was on the second and the third rank, respectively.

c. Nokia was followed by Motorola and Ericsson, each of which were on the second and the third rank, respectively.

d. Nokia was followed by Motorola and Ericsson, each of which was on the second and the third rank, respectively.

I have searched in Google but I have not found any answer yet. I just guess the answer is A.

Any suggestion regarding this issue?

Thank you

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  • The question is somewhat confusing. Is Nokia in the first rank, Motorola in the second, and Ericsson in the third? If so, it sounds odd to have a three-part statement split into two clauses. Also, the rank for Ericsson is missing in the original sentence. That's the main reason for the ambiguity. Commented Aug 1, 2017 at 19:46
  • Thanks for giving a comment. Indeed, Nokia in the first rank. I have also put the rank for Ericsson.
    – 7447
    Commented Aug 1, 2017 at 19:59
  • It might sound odd. I should have written other examples which are clearer. But, the point of this question is that if I should use "each of which" or "all of which" if I want to use the word "respectively" at the end of the sentence.
    – 7447
    Commented Aug 1, 2017 at 20:22
  • "With" is your friend. "Nokia was ranked first, with Motorola in second and Ericsson in third." If you want to smack down Ericsson: "Nokia was ranked first, with Motorola in second and Ericsson bringing up the rear." Lose "respectively" unless there is a need to sound all professorial (or Teutonic!) about it. Commented Aug 1, 2017 at 23:07

1 Answer 1

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You are probably German. Respectively is a much rarer word in English than beziehungssweise is in German, and if you find yourself using it, you should probably think twice. (Furthermore, if you are tempted to abbreviate respectively as resp. you will instantly give away your identity as a German while also not being well understood by native English speakers)

In this case, it is better not to use either "each of which" or "all of which", and you can simply say:

Nokia, Motorola, and Ericsson were ranked first, second, and third, respectively.

In less-technical contexts or if you just want to sound more like a native speaker, you'll be better understood if you just say

Nokia, Motorola, and Ericsson were ranked first, second, and third.

or if you must be absolutely clear about the order of the rankings,

Nokia ranked first, Motorola came second, and Ericsson third.

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