2

The West Indies team had not won any match last year.

This question came in my exam , I corrected 'did not win'

But they are saying no error ....

Is there any possibility to use HAD like this?

1
  • 2
    There is every possibility. Have you learnt to conjugate the English verb win? This is a perfectly grammatical use of the past perfect of the verb win, however clumsy and unidiomatic it may be. (The plural matches would be more idiomatic, but this is to be expected, because the exam was probably written by someone who doesn't speak English!) – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica Aug 2 '17 at 5:35
2

The West Indies team had not won any match last year.

makes no sense to me (as a native British English speaker).

Firstly it needs to either be a match or any matches. Secondly "had won" only works if "until / up to a certain point" is used.

Some grammatical options are:

  • The West Indies team did not win any matches last year.

  • The West Indies team have not won any matches this year.

  • The West Indies team had not won any matches by August last year.

  • The West Indies team had not won any matches until last year..

In any of my above options a match could be used instead of any matches.

0

The only problem is that it should be "matches".

"Not any" always takes a plural or non-counted noun. When used with a singular noun it has the meaning of "Not just any [thing] but a particular, special [thing]".

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.