0

I want to express there are two things with unique characteristics. I know it's an oxymoron, so I'll be glad if you suggest me a better formulation. I would express it either like:

a) Christianity, Islam and Buddhism are three of the few religions which draw from the older religions.

b) Christianity, Islam and Buddhism are ones of the few religions which draw from the older religions.

c) Christianity, Islam and Buddhism are some of the few religions which draw from the older religions.

The sentences are just examples that popped in my mind.

6
  • 1
    Any number of things can have unique characteristics; there is no oxymoron in your first statement. Of your three sentences, the first and third are at least grammatical in English. (You are talking about three things, not two, and "gladder" is not a word in English.) – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica Aug 2 '17 at 9:19
  • @P.E.Dant Funny, Grammarly suggested me "gladder" instead of "more glad". The examples are just examples. Please edit, if you see anything wrong. – Probably Aug 2 '17 at 10:42
  • @P.E.Dant, apparently 'gladder' is a word in English. However, it is rarely used in the modern day literature. Here is the Ngram to show the word's decline in usage, and perhaps the reason why most of us are unaware of its existance. – Varun Nair Aug 2 '17 at 11:32
  • one of the few is a common collocation, but two, three, n of the few would be an oddity. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 2 '17 at 12:52
  • @P.E.Dant, several things can have unique characteristics. But they can't all have the same unique characteristic. (OP: you could say the characteristic is rare or uncommon rather than unique) – The Photon Aug 2 '17 at 14:53
2

one of the few is a common collocation, but two, three, n of the few would be an oddity.

The typical way of handling this situation is not to bother counting, but to say something like:

Of the few X's that blah blah blah, A and B yadda yadda yadda.

Of the few X's that blah blah blah, A, B, and C yadda yadda yadda.

7
  • Sorry, I'm not sure what you mean by that. How can I apply that to my sentence? – Probably Aug 2 '17 at 12:57
  • Of the few religions, which draw from the older religions, there are Christianity, Islam and Buddhism? – Probably Aug 2 '17 at 12:58
  • Of the few religions which draw from the older religions, Christianity, Islam, and Buddhism {have the most adherents}. { } is some meaningful predicate that goes beyond stating the fact that they belong to a qualified set. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 2 '17 at 13:03
  • If all you want to do is state the fact that A, B, and C belong to a qualified set that contains only a few members:. There are only a few religions which draw from older religions; three of them are Christianity, Islam, and Buddhism. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 2 '17 at 13:05
  • Ok, sure, I see your point. – Probably Aug 2 '17 at 13:19
1

" ... are among the few ..."

" ... are among the very few ... "

" ... are three of only a handful of ..."

" ... are unusual among religions in that they draw ..."

1
  • But smatterer is cheating with of only a handful :) The question is about few with a number greater than one. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 2 '17 at 13:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.