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Imagine my friend and me are swapping houses simultaneously next week:I am going to his house and he is going to mine, I'd like to know when he is going to arrive at my home.

Can I say "When are you arriving at my home exactly?" or"When are you going to arrive at my home?"

I think the first one is better because it has already been planned so present continuous seems for me better

  • Both sentences are perfectly fine and convey the meaning you want. Neither sentence is better than the other. – Phil14 Aug 4 '17 at 11:44
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I believe both sentences are correct.

When are you arriving at my home?

You can use the present progressive tense to talk about firm plans that you have for the future or arrangements which have been made.

When are you going to arrive at my home?"

You can use going to to talk about planned future events or intentions.

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I think you need to stick with the second one, because the action (arriving) has not happened yet, nor is it in progress. If he was on his way to your house, you might be OK with the first one.

To address the "planning" issue, you could use:

When are you planning to arrive at my home?
When are you planning to arrive at my home exactly?

  • I am visting my mother next week, we can use progressive even the action has not happened yet but is in progress like the arriving in my question – user5577 Aug 4 '17 at 20:32
  • I think "arriving" and other gerunds could be used, such as "When are you coming over today?" and "When are we meeting on Wednesday?" – Kman3 Aug 4 '17 at 21:17

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