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Here is the sentences which I can't understand completely:

I moved from a careless indigence while I was a student to an intermittent prosperity.

And here is more context:

To talk about money is always to talk about oneself. I was spared the injury of poverty; after a difficult youth my parents achieved a degree of affluence before sinking into debt. They began to count their pennies, and endured the bitterness of losing their social status. Death came to them when they were in a state of near destitution. So far as I was concerned, I moved from a careless indigence while I was a student to an intermittent prosperity.

What does the writer mean? Is he implying that he was first "a careless indigent" and then become a "student to an intermittent prosperity"?

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    No, I believe the intended reading of the sentence is I moved from [ a careless indigence while I was a student ] to [ an intermittent prosperity ]. What does become a student to something even mean? – userr2684291 Aug 4 '17 at 11:25
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The writer means that he/she moved from the state of careless indigence to the state of intermittent prosperity. So he was first a careless indigent and then became an intermittent prosperity

The while I was a student part is a bit ambiguous though. It could either mean that he was a student only in the state of careless indigence or that he was a student in both states.

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