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What is the difference between "Twin bed" and "Double bed"? I'm a little bit lost since they sounds to me the same, but on the searching hotels site there are both appears as two different things. By googling I didn't find a clear answer to my question. At the moment, with my English knowledge it doesn't make sense for me that it is a single bed, because a single bed it's a single bed rather than twin bed. Isn't it?

This is how it looks like in the site that I mentioned above:

enter image description here

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    Twin beds are two beds - with the implication that they're the same general size & shape (if not identical), so they can be pushed together and pretty much be treated as a double bed if the occupying couple so wish. Sometimes they'll have an easy way to lock/unlock the two halves so they don't tend to drift apart during vigorous use! – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Aug 6 '17 at 17:55
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    Bed size. Twin beds, while often used as two in one room, can be used individually. – user3169 Aug 6 '17 at 17:57
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    Twin beds are what Ted and Dougal had in Father Ted. Double bed is what Morecambe and Wise had. – Majenko Aug 6 '17 at 18:57
  • @Fumble if two twin beds are shoved side by side, they give you the same surface area as a king bed, not a double bed. This is from the US point of view. – green_ideas Aug 6 '17 at 23:53
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    Note that on the image you posted the term "twin beds" is plural, there's an 'S' after "bed" which you forgot to add in your question title and body. If you googled "twin" or "twins" you would have known that it means two siblings born on the same day from the same parent, and two identical or matching things. – Mari-Lou A Aug 7 '17 at 6:57
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From my experience in the travel industry: "twin" ("TWN") means 2 separate single-person beds with a fair amount of free space separating them, while double ("DBL") means one bed sized appropriately for 2 persons to sleep together on it comfortably (or an imitation of such made of 2 single beds put together with absolutely no distance left to separate them).

I am not sure if the meaning is the same all over the world (my whole experience is about continental Europe) but I believe this is why your example says "twin bedS" (plural) but "double bed" (singular) actually.

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A double bed is a bed large enough for two adults. The word "double" refers to the number of occupants. A bed described as "double" in an advertisement will probably be 54 inches wide, a size also called "full". In the US nowadays most couples who sleep double have a larger mattress in "queen size" which is 60 inches wide or "king size" which is 76 inches wide.

For a while it was popular for couples to sleep in two smaller beds set up side-by-side, with a space for walking between them. These are referred to as "twin beds" because there were two of them and they were identical. Mattresses for such beds are 38 inches wide. Though it is not strictly correct, beds for children are often called "twin beds" because they take a mattress of the same size.

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    "Double" is also called "Full" : sleeptrain.com/mattress-size-chart/… – ColleenV Aug 6 '17 at 18:48
  • @ColleenV True. I have added it. – David42 Aug 6 '17 at 19:04
  • I would say at least as many married American couples share a king bed as share a queen, if not more. Many unmarried American adults sleep in a queen size bed all alone. Bunk beds are either always twin size or other sizes are so rare I've never heard of them. Some American university dormitory beds are long twin beds, same width as twin but something like six or eight inches longer. – Todd Wilcox Aug 6 '17 at 23:20
  • "A double bed is a bed large enough for two adults." Not really, and especially not in the obesity age, or era. – green_ideas Aug 6 '17 at 23:51
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    @ToddWilcox All true. I was debating whether to mention king size beds. Since they are double beds, I have added it. But, I am trying to limit my answer to the scope of the question. The questioner asked not about twin vs. double, not about mattresses sizes. – David42 Aug 6 '17 at 23:55

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