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I know, for a specific date, it is used on: On 16 May 2016.

I also know, when you refer to a month or year alone you use in: In June, In 2000

But I saw in internet some sources that when you put together a month and the year, they use both "on" and "in". I suppose that the correct form is In May of 2000.

Which form is correct? On May of 2000 or in May of 2000?

Also, is it necessary to put "of" or not? For example: May 2000 or May of 2000

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When talking about a specific date you use "on". For example,

Pope John would pass away the following year, and the last session of the Council would be closed by Pope Paul VI on December 8, 1965.

When talking about a month, you use "in". For example,

The following events occurred in October 1962.

And if you have a particular duration of time that you want to talk about, you can use either "during" or "from-to". For example,

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945.

OR

During 1944 and 1945 the Japanese suffered major reverses in mainland Asia in South Central China and Burma, while the Allies crippled the Japanese Navy and captured key Western Pacific islands.

Hope that helps.

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