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I read this in a website:

"We notice you are using an ad blocker. Please consider supporting us by upgrading your account. Thanks."

Shouldn't they have used "have noticed"? "We notice" sounds like this is some routine exercise that they do daily, for example "I see sun rise everyday". It sounds a bit odd to me but it may be because English is not my native language.

"We have noticed you are using an ad blocker. Please consider supporting us by upgrading your account. Thanks."

What would have been a difference, if any? Which of the two sentences sound more natural and is used more frequently by native speakers?

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They notice that you are using an AdBlocker. - They notice you doing it right now.

The have noticed that you are using an AdBlocker. - They noticed it previously and are now coming to you.

Really doesn't make any difference to be honest.

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There is not a whit of difference between them. Why do you think they ought to have used the perfect rather than the simple present? Is there a reason to believe that they are not noticing in the present? If you're going to use the perfect, why not go all the way and write: "We have noticed you have been using an ad blocker."

This use of the present is perfectly idiomatic and correct in English. For instance, "I see you are reading that book." No-one would ever think of saying "I have seen that you are reading that book." We do not use the perfect unless it is necessary - P.E.Dant

  • Of course, I have seen you are reading that book is not the same as I see you are reading that book. There is a nuanced difference. Too lazy to explain it. – Lambie Feb 21 '18 at 0:45
  • what about "I am seeing that you are reading that book " ? – Prof-Wiz Jun 2 '18 at 19:34

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