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I'm reading Stoner by John Williams and there is the following sentence:

He never went into that room that he did not glance at the seat he had once occupied, and he was always slightly surprised to discover that he was not there.

Given the context, I assume the sentence means something like 'He never went into that room without glancing at the seat he had once occupied, and he was always slightly surprised to discover that he was not there.'

Is my interpretation correct? If yes, is the original construction maybe of a somewhat outdated form or is that really proper and common English?

I already asked a native speaker and a non-native English teacher, but they both couldn't help me out.

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    Your interpretation is correct; the original is correct though a marked literary usage (not common); I couldn't say whether or not it's dated/archaic. – Jeff Zeitlin Aug 8 '17 at 15:53
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    There, that has the force of such that (such that he did not glance -> "without glancing", as you surmised). I wonder if you might still hear it used today in some rural dialects. I never saw him that he did not have his dog at his side. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 8 '17 at 16:54
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"He never went into the room that he did not glance at the seal..." must involve elision. To spell it out for parsing: "There was no time that he ever went into the room that didn't involve his glancing at the seal..."

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