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This is a new technology based on Georges Charpak’s research on gaseous particle detection with a multi-wire proportional chamber with which he won the Nobel Prize in 1992.

I'm trying to explain that George Charpak developed this new technology and that he won the Nobel Prize for this discovery. But I trying to write as fluent as possible in this phrase. Is 'with which' used correctly in this sentence?

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    I would use "for which", though am not sure. Aug 10, 2017 at 18:45
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    @Will is right. He won the prize for his work. The work, for which he won the prize, ...
    – TimR
    Aug 10, 2017 at 21:14

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You get a Nobel prize or Grammy or any reward for something not with something.

With refers to "together" or "in company" which don't really fit here.

You actually answered your own doubt in your second paragraph:

I'm trying to explain that George Charpak developed this new technology and that he won the Nobel Prize for this discovery. But I trying to write as fluent as possible in this phrase.

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  • Contrast with: "This is a new technology based on Georges Charpak’s research on gaseous particle detection with a multi-wire proportional chamber, with which he won the 1992 World Gaseous Particle Detection Pro/Am Championships."
    – Adam
    Aug 10, 2017 at 21:22

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