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My friend is gone on Annual vacation from feb17 to jun17.

or

My friend is gone from feb17 to jun17 on Annual vacation.

Which is the correct sentence and placement?

closed as off-topic by user3169, James K, Varun Nair, shin, kiamlaluno Aug 11 '17 at 9:09

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1

I think both sentences are correct. In both sentences, it is clear what is being stated, regardless of the order of the phrases.

There is some confusion about whether you intend 17 to mean the year 2017 or the 17th of the month. I assume you mean the year 2017, but I'm not sure.

Also, in formal, written English, it would be better to capitalize month names and use periods after abbreviations, and it would be good to remove the initial capital from Annual vacation:

My friend is gone on annual vacation from Feb. 17th to Jun. 17th.

My friend is gone from Feb. 17th to Jun. 17th on annual vacation.

Or if you intend 17 to be the year 2017, you could write it this way:

My friend is gone on annual vacation from Feb. '17 to Jun. '17.

My friend is gone from Feb. '17 to Jun. '17 on annual vacation.

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The mentioned sentences are grammatically incorrect. You can say:

  1. My friend is on an annual vacation from Feb'17 to June'17.
  2. From Feb'17 to June'17, my friend is on an annual vacation.
  • 1
    This answer would be better if you explained why you think the suggested sentences are incorrect. – Adam Aug 10 '17 at 22:19

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