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1) I chose to become a "job'' in the hopes of making lots of money so I could buy a home. Why do you want to become a ''job''?.

2) I chose to become a ''job'' in the hopes of making lots of money so I can buy a home. Why do you want to become a ''job'' ?.

Which one is correct ?

1 Answer 1

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The simple answer to your question is that you should use "can," but commentors will complain because I'm supporting the most-correct use of the verb in a poorly structured sentence.

So, one way to properly structure those sentences is (and I'm assuming some of your intent... I could be wrong):

I chose my career with the hope of making enough money to buy a home. Why did you choose your career?

An example of colloquial (spoken, not necessarily "book English") structure would be:

I picked my job in the hope that I could buy a home. Why did you pick your job?

As you can see, I did not use "can."

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  • okey and why didn't you use can in your sentence ' I picked my job in the hope that I could buy a home. Why did you pick your job? ' ? Commented Aug 12, 2017 at 12:58
  • Ah! I should have noticed this when I answered. Because the sentence is written in the past tense. The verb "can" is present tense. "I'm working this job in the hope that I can buy a home. Why are you working your job?"
    – JBH
    Commented Aug 12, 2017 at 13:56
  • And I also failed to notice that you appear to be using "job" (with the quotes) as a placeholder. In other words, "I chose to become an engineer with the hope that I could buy a home. Why did you choose to become a doctor?"
    – JBH
    Commented Aug 12, 2017 at 13:58

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