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Can I use the word any as an adverb to modify past participle? I've heard phrases like:

Is it any good?

Can I make the following sentence by analogy:

Are these coins any valued by collectors?

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    I've only really heard 'any' used as an adverb in the construction 'any good?', to express that the speaker is doubtful. In the second example you might want to say 'Are these coins valued at all/ somewhat / to some extent by collectors?'
    – 13509
    Aug 15, 2017 at 10:02
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    "Are these coins any value for collectors" may be closer to what you mean.
    – Aric
    Aug 15, 2017 at 10:13
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    In "Is it any good?", "any" is not an adverb but a determinative functioning as a degree modifier. But "any" can't generally modify verbs so your second example is ungrammatical.
    – BillJ
    Aug 15, 2017 at 10:57
  • @AricFowler - Shouldn't it be "of any value for [coin] collectors"?
    – Victor B.
    Sep 22, 2017 at 23:41
  • @Ropey it should, but it is common to leave the word "of" out.
    – Aric
    Sep 24, 2017 at 14:11

1 Answer 1

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In "Is it any good?", "any" is not an adverb but a determinative functioning as a degree modifier. But "any" can't generally modify verbs so your second example is ungrammatical.

BillJ

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