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I like the song "Come Together" by the Beatles. However, I don't know the exact meaning of the word "over" in the lyrics:

[Chorus]
Come together, right now
Over me

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As always, Lennon's lyrics can have many interpretations. My own is in keeping with the unifying sentiment of the times. Each verse describes a person who is divisive in some way. The chorus tells us to "come together," to put aside our differences, "over" the person in the verse, that is, over his objections.

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    But "over me" never means "over my objections" in normal speech. It seems you're making things up. And even if it did have that meaning, it would be nonsensical: come together, despite my objections? Despite my objections to what, your coming together? Aug 17 '17 at 9:40
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With "come together", the object of over is the cause, justification, basis, or occasion of an action whose purpose is to attain or express agreement, covenant, unity, solidarity, or camaraderie.

They discussed the deal over a cup of coffee.

They celebrated their success over a few beers at the pub.

To express our gratitude we come together over a thanksgiving feast.

Consider also the notion of "covenant over dead victims" described here (pp. 146-47).

And this, about a balloonist setting a world record for the highest skydive:

"The online global community came together for an hour to witness history and I don't recall anything like it. Everyone was positively giddy. For an hour we came together over one breathtaking event." Derman Scott, (The New Rules of Marketing & PR )

The breathtaking event, as it was watched and shared by the online community, was an occasion for them to unite.

P.S. With "fighting", "disagreeing", etc. the object of over is the cause, justification, basis, or occasion of dissent.

The dogs were fighting over a bone.

The siblings had a falling out over how to divide the estate.

They had a disagreement over States rights versus Federal powers.

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