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The following sentence is what I am going to write into my thesis,

Considering the limitation of the problem, for example, a central robot is necessary to do something and it has to be aware of a number, we introduce the concept of mobility.

I just wonder if there are any grammatical errors here. Is it correct to use "for example" here as a conjunction and add a sentence after it as an example?

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  • All the comments have been purged. Comments are for clarifying the question, not for attempting to answer it. Also, Be Nice. If someone is not being nice, flag it for a moderator instead of engaging in back and forth comments with them.
    – ColleenV
    Feb 13 '18 at 18:39
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After reading this webpage about the usage of 'for example', I think my sentence posted above is incorrect. So I modify it to:

There are some limitations of the problem. For example, a central robot is necessary to do something and it has to be aware of a number. Therefore, we introduce the concept of mobility.

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  • A "problem" is usually already a "limitation." Your second two sentences are pretty good, now, but "limitations to the problem" is odd. If you "limit" a "problem," you actually make a situation better. Normally, you would talk about limitations to a solution of some kind. Feb 13 '18 at 11:18

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