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So, i have to translate a sentence that basically has this meaning:

There cannot be a validity date before the revision date.

Or in broken english but making sense logically:

Validity date must be > than revision date.

How would I form the sentence precisely and formally? Perhaps the following:

The validity date cannot be anterior to the revision date.

Is the sentence above correct? How would you, as a native speaker, change it to make it sound more natural and formal?

Thank you all in advance.

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    Are there any problems with "The validity date cannot be before the revision date"? – as4s4hetic Aug 14 '17 at 13:56
  • No problems, but it sounds weird to me (not a native speaker) – EliaMelfior Aug 14 '17 at 14:00
  • Do you mean Validity date must be > revision date or Validity date must be revision date? Your first sentence matches the latter; for the former, you'd need something like "The validity date must be after the revision date" or "There cannot be a validity date before or on the revision date." – 1006a Aug 14 '17 at 14:01
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    Actually it's ≥, i think that i will use "The validity date cannot be before the revision date", as suggested by as4s4hetic – EliaMelfior Aug 14 '17 at 14:05
  • You can also say "The validity date must be later than the revision date" – Zubin Mukerjee Aug 14 '17 at 14:40
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The simplest way to say this is:

The validity date cannot be before the revision date.

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Early and late are more specifically related to time than before and after and so I would say the validity date cannot be earlier than the revision date.

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