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If we had Sachin in our team, we would have won the match against your team.

Which is the correct way to correct this sentence ? I have learned that the general form of a wish of present is something like this if I were you I would study more.

And for wishes of past the form is like If he had a few hours to spare, he would have spent them in a public library.

But I think the had in the question which I asked and the had in the example which I gave is not same. So how do I correct the sentence ?

In this way

If we had had Sachin in our team, we would have won the match against your team.

Or

If we had Sachin in our team, we would win the match against your team.

  • If we had had Sachin in our team, we would have won the match against your team, or a bit literary/formal: Had we had Sachin in our team, we would have won the match against your team. – Michael Login Aug 20 '17 at 16:37
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    Possible duplicate of Is it right conditional sentence? – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Aug 20 '17 at 17:03
  • You need past perfect (had had) if what you're trying to say is that you'd have won if Sachin had been in your team in the past, when you played the match (with no particular implication as to whether he's in the team now, or even whether you're thinking about the current team line-up at all). If you use simple past (had), you're imagining a hypothetical current situation where he is in the team (with the implication that if he were, he'd also have been there at the time of the game). So both are acceptable - it's just a matter of intended nuance. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Aug 20 '17 at 17:12
  • ...note that your final example is speculating about the outcome of a future game, not one that you've already played and lost. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Aug 20 '17 at 17:15
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The error is different. We normally say someone is on a team.

If we had Sachin on our team, we would have won the match against your team.

I am not aware of a specific reason, but this definition of on may work:

  1. preposition
    You use on to introduce an activity that someone is doing, particularly travelling.
    Students on the full-time course of study are usually sponsored.

(AmE disclaimer...)

  • That's what I thought as well, but it seems in is simply more common in BrE. Note that these sentence correction questions are usually asked by Indians, and they're supposed to teach some sort of archaic/formal BrE. – userr2684291 Aug 20 '17 at 19:05
  • @userr2684291 Could be, I'll add the standard disclaimer. The OP should add their locale in this case. I'll wait to see what other answers show up. – user3169 Aug 20 '17 at 19:09

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