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In the sentence:

"Either you must grant his request or incur his wrath."

I suppose the must word should be deleted to make it grammatically correct?

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    "You must either grant his request or incur his wrath." is more idiomatic. – Davo Aug 21 '17 at 17:59
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    @Davo better writing style, yes, but not necessarily more natural. People talk like that all the time, especially when they're not thinking ahead to what sounds best. – Andrew Aug 21 '17 at 18:24
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    “You must either grant …” is better (as @Davo says). You could omit it but the word “must” emphasizes that these are the only two choices (in contrast to “You may either grant …”) – smatterer Aug 22 '17 at 3:05
  • I agree with @smatterer – the word "must" should be moved, not deleted. – J.R. Aug 22 '17 at 6:52
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If you remove the word "must" the sentence sounds as though a direct order is given (masks the right to choose):

  • Either you grant his request or (you'll) incur his wrath. (If you don't do it something bad is going to happen to you)

With "must" included the sentences is less strict but still with obligation:

  • Either you must grant his request or incur his wrath. (You have a choice either to grant his request or to incur his wrath)

As @Davo commented a more idiomatic way of saying it is:

  • You must either grant his request or incur his wrath.
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