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I do not really understand the proposal: Really...Really...Fat. Help me to understand this sentence.

It will be right or I not correctly think? "We are talking about the man who will become fat." Why fat? What do we mean?

The phrase was taken from the sentence "I'm not gonna kill you. I'm just gonna make you... really... really. fat." in these pictures:

The face of the McDonald's mascot Ronald McDonald with the text "I'm not going to kill you. I'm just gonna make you really really fat.

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The image says:

  • I'm not going to kill you - I'm going to make you really, really fat.

To make somebody fat refers to the act of giving people food that makes them fat. It doesn't kill you but it does create a lot of problems for you that are mostly related to health.

  • Well. If translated into Russian, it turns out some nonsense. I am interested in how native English speakers understand this phrase. – Vladimir Glinskikh Aug 22 '17 at 7:38
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    @Владимир In Russian it is, "Я Вас не убью - я сделаю Вас поистине толстыми" which we can understand as "дам вам то, от чего Вы сильно потолстеете". – SovereignSun Aug 22 '17 at 7:43
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    I wait a little while yet, maybe someone else will answer. Want to read other options. – Vladimir Glinskikh Aug 22 '17 at 7:49
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    This answer is correct. It may help the OP to know that the picture is of the clown Ronald McDonald, the mascot for the McDonalds burger restaurant chain. It would probably also help the OP to know that there are lots of movies in which clowns are serial killers. And that there was a recent spate of people dressing up in scary clown costumes and scaring people. And that McDonalds were therefore worried that people would be scared by the mascot Ronald McDonald for a while, scared that he might be a killer clown, so they stopped using him. – AndyT Aug 22 '17 at 9:45
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This is more than understanding English, but also the cultural background of the picture:

  • The character in the meme is Ronald McDonald, a mascot from a U.S.-originated fast-food restuarant called McDonalds, part of McDonald's branding up until the mid to late 1980's.
  • In the U.S., since the late 80's or even earlier, clowns have more or less become associated with evil due to horror movies - children for a long time have been more scared of them than considering them entertainment.
  • America has high obesity rates.
  • McDonalds provides very cheap food.
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    I disagree with the last assertion. McDonalds is quite expensive in Russia )))) But +1 for the clowns being scary rather than entertaining! – SovereignSun Aug 22 '17 at 12:49
  • @LawrenceC There is even a so-called phobia fear of clowns "Coulrophobia". – Vladimir Glinskikh Aug 22 '17 at 12:54
  • In this case, I think it's a pretty specific allusion to a line spoken by the Joker in Suicide Squad, and not just a "killer clown" reference. – ColleenV Aug 23 '17 at 12:36
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Agree with LawrenceC's answer. Clowns have been used as horror characters, killing people (first image below).

Ronald (McDonald) is a clown, and the meme (the image in the OP) says that Ronald will not kill you the way those clowns in the horror films would, however, he'll make you fat (fastfood, calories etc. [debates are all over the web regarding this]) essentially (and impliedly) 'killing' you slowly through health-related diseases.

creepy clown faces

VS

McDonald's symbol with the text "Fast Food. Slow Death."

Here's a card:

Fake collectible card game card with the McDonald's mascot on it

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