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I've learned that 'do' has to stand with ordinary verbs, for example 'I don't love him'. Therefore, I feel confused when hearing people say 'don't be shy'. I wonder why 'to be' and 'do' can stand together.

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  • Why not? What is the problem? – Hot Licks Aug 26 '17 at 11:53
  • I've learned that we couldn't use 'is, am, are' and 'do, does' at the same time. For example we dont say she don't be beautiful. – user8498054 Aug 26 '17 at 12:11
  • Because you wouldn't say "she be beautiful". You would say "she is beautiful". But you might say "you be beautiful" (though typically the "you" would be elided). – Hot Licks Aug 26 '17 at 12:15
  • Sorry for being silly but i'm still confused. 😞. So why dont we say you not be beautiful? Because we usually use 'not' with 'to be' like you're not beautiful. Could you share me some websites or things related to this gramatical point? Thank you so much. – user8498054 Aug 26 '17 at 12:34
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    [You] be good is an "imperative" utterance (instructing someone), where You are good is a "statement" (describing someone). When negating the imperative we usually include an auxiliary verb (often, "do-support"), giving Don't [you] be naughty today (Be not naughty is antiquated phrasing). – FumbleFingers Aug 26 '17 at 12:42
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[You] be good is an "imperative" utterance (instructing someone), where You are good is a "statement" (describing someone). When negating the imperative we usually include an auxiliary verb (often, "do-support"), giving Don't [you] be naughty today (Be not naughty is antiquated phrasing).

– FumbleFingers Aug 26

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