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Please explain the meaning of "get the thrill out of them" in this sentence:

the main reason why people go for dangerous sports is that they get the thrill out of them

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    Not "the thrill", they get "a thrill" out of them. In other words, the sports are thrilling. – EllieK Aug 28 '17 at 13:47
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    And them is the sports, not the people. – StoneyB on hiatus Aug 28 '17 at 13:48
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We don't normally say we get a thrill out of SOMEBODY, we say we get a thrill out of some activity. This means that the activity excites the person.

"I get a thrill out of English grammar" means that discussing English grammar excites me. I really, really like doing it.

"The main reason why people go for dangerous sports is that they get a thrill out of them." Dangerous sports are exciting. They thrill people.

BTW, note we would probably say they get "a thrill", not "the thrill", here, because this sentence is probably introducing the thrill, it is not yet specific. If you went on to discuss the subject further, it would become "the thrill". Like, "The reason people go for dangerous sports is that they get a thrill out of them. The thrill begins the moment they begin ..." or whatever.

You could say that you get a thrill out of a person if this person excites you. For example if you are romantically involved. You MIGHT say this when talking about some great person who inspires you, but a fluent speaker would be more likely to say that they get a thrill out of the person's actions or achievements than the person himself. Like I think someone would be much more likely to say, "I get a thrill out of listening to Senator Smith's speeches" than "I get a thrill out of Senator Smith" or "I get a thrill out of reading Einstein's books". Again, unless the speaker is Senator Smith's boyfriend, etc.

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