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"Since the sun is already setting and the town is still for good four hours of ride afar, I think it would be wise to wait the night out here."

Is the use of "for good few hours" correct?

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    The original sentence does not look correct to this native US English speaker. I would say something like "the town is still a good four hours' ride".
    – stangdon
    Aug 28, 2017 at 19:01
  • Bah, I meant to clarify the proposed edit.
    – Davo
    Aug 28, 2017 at 19:22

1 Answer 1

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After reading the question a few times, I understand that

Since the sun is already setting and the town is still for good four hours of ride afar, I think it would be wise to wait the night out here.

could be better written as

Since the sun is already setting and the town is still a good four hours ride away, I think it would be wise to wait the night out here.

The phrase "a good four hours" means "at least four hours".

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  • Yeah. That might be it. Thanks for the help. I really appreciate it.
    – DZverec
    Aug 28, 2017 at 19:13
  • The use of an apostrophe in "four hours' ride" is debatable, since time cannot own anything. Perhaps better as "a good four hour ride". As in "a four cigarette job" ;) Aug 28, 2017 at 19:16
  • The apostrophe doesn't have to mark possession, and in this case it doesn't. Four-hour is an adjective that's usually hyphenated. This is true of American English, as well as of other, less represented varieties of English.
    – user3395
    Aug 28, 2017 at 23:36

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