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Are both of these correct?

  1. The email address of the Facebook account to delete is user@example.com.

  2. The email address of the Facebook account to be deleted is user@example.

In case #1 is correct, does it mean the same as #2? #2 appears to be a passive voice construction. In case #1 is correct, what type of sentence/clause construction is it or how do we call it?

  • As is? Because there's no verb in sentence 1.... so do you want them to be considered as phrases or as full sentences? – Catija Sep 5 '17 at 20:11
  • Neither one of these is a complete sentence. – J.R. Sep 5 '17 at 20:11
  • @J.R. yeah... I was just realizing that. :/ So I think we need some more information. – Catija Sep 5 '17 at 20:12
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    @Catija - If I had a nickel for every time I saw a question asking "Which of these sentences is correct?", and the samples given weren't even complete sentences, then I could probably buy an overpriced grande coffee at Starbucks – assuming the cashier would take all those nickels. (To the OP: please give more details, context, and research...) – J.R. Sep 5 '17 at 20:16
  • Hi, I just updated the question. Are these complete sentences now? Thanks – user1764381 Sep 5 '17 at 20:36
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We call it an Infinitival Relative Clause (hereafter, IRC). Or if you don't want to analyze it as a relative clause, you can just call it a post-modifing infinitival clause. This IRC is so flexible that it can occur with either a passive voice or an active voice. This is explained by Biber et al. in Longman Student Grammar of Spoken and Written English.

Postmodifying to-clauses are more flexible than participle clauses for two reasons: they can occur with both subject and non-subject gaps [...]

  • The e-mail address of the Facebook account to delete
    (This is in the active voice. The object of the verb delete is missing, so this IRC has a non-subject gap.)

  • The e-mail address of the Facebook account to be deleted
    (This is in the passive voice. The subject of the infinitival clause is missing, so this IRC has a subject gap.)

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