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Assuming that there are three PCs: PC1, PC2, and PC3. PC1 is most expensive, and PC3 is cheapest. In this case, does the following sentence make sense?

I have three PCs: PC1, PC2, and PC3 that are (mentioned) in order of decreasing price.

More specifically, I would like to know whether it is possible to omit the verb "mentioned" or the like.

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You can omit "that are mentioned":

I have three PCs: PC1, PC2 and PC3, in order of decreasing price.

The list is apposition to the noun phrase "three PCs", The last phrase is simply descriptive it doesn't have to be a full clause.

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I wouldn't say that mentioned is incorrect. However, a better choice might be listed.

I might say it like this:

I have three PCs: PC1, PC2, and PC3; they are listed in order of decreasing price.

You could also use named instead of mentioned.

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