1

As if living on a different planet, students complain that the cost of tuition — averaging $6,500 a year in 2016-17 — is so high that it may never pay off, especially in the gig economy, where jobs are precarious.

Yes, post-secondary education makes you rich, but that may not be the best part

What does the 'gig economy' mean? I looked up a few dictionaries for the word 'gig' before I posted this question but couldn't wrap my head around it when it came with the word 'economy.'

  • 3
    It is not a standard collocation. The noun gig is used attributively with economy to mean "an economy characterized by gigs" or where the typical job is a gig, that is, an economy where jobs tend to be short-term and project-oriented, rather than jobs where the holder enters onto a career path within a large organization and can expect to progress upward within the organization. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 12 '17 at 18:16
  • @Tᴚoɯɐuo Okay, I've got it. I looked up a few dictionaries for the word 'gig' before I posted this question but couldn't wrap my head around it when it came with the word 'economy.' Thank you. – whitecap Sep 12 '17 at 18:30
  • 2
    You should include what research you did when you post your question so that the folks answering it know what you tried. – ColleenV Sep 12 '17 at 22:43
3

"Gig economy" is, as Tᴚoɯɐuo explains in his comment, a job market characterized by gigs rather than steady, long-term employment.

Gig (n): A job, especially one that is temporary or that has an uncertain future.

The phrase is most often used by musicians and similar performing artists whose income often depends on how many gigs they can line up. The author of your quote suggests this kind of practice has become common for young people in any job, making their income variable and uncertain, and making it difficult to pay off their student loans.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.