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He is eating.

He is eating for a long time.

How do I say he takes a long time to eat lunch? Would it sound awkward?

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    Anecdotally, and idiomatically, I routinely hear "he took a long lunch". – Jeff Zeitlin Sep 13 '17 at 14:20
  • Your own phrasing is fine - he takes a long time to eat lunch. – Lawrence Sep 13 '17 at 16:26
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This is a good example where you want to use the present perfect progressive tense to say that the action started in the past and is still going on:

He has been eating for a long time.

Other examples:

He has been resting since yesterday.

My son has been playing his game all day.

Alternately, use the present perfect to indicate a condition that started in the past and is still valid:

He has been at lunch for a long while.

He has been tired for some time.

My son has been an avid gamer since he could pick up the controller.

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