1

I need you to read something I wrote, and tell me how you liked it.

I need you to read something I wrote, and tell me how you like it.

Do both the sentences mean the same thing? Are both grammatically correct?

1

Try this and tell me if it tastes good to you.

Try this and then tell me if it tasted good to you.

The first asks for the person's opinion reached by tasting the food.

The second asks for the person's opinion in light of an action they have completed, namely, they tasted the food.

0

Both would be understood as meaning much the same thing, and I think both sentences are defensible, but the first one sounds a bit odd because "liked" is in the past even though they haven't read it yet. The oddness disappears if you say "...and after you've read it, tell me how you liked it".

Still, the present tense "like" is more idiomatic here.

However, we'd be more likely to say something like:

I'd like you to read something I've written and tell me what you think of it.

"I'd like" is motivated by considerations of politeness. Even if the person is a friend of yours, it is better to ask nicely.

The preference for "I've written" here is marginal (and may even be a matter of dialect or idiolect).

"Tell me how you like it" is grammatically unobjectionable, but a native speaker would be much more likely to say either "tell me whether you like it" or "tell me what you think of it" (or just "tell me what you think").

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