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If anyone could teach me how to play the guitar, I'd much appreciate it.

If someone could teach me how to play the guitar, I'd much appreciate it.

Do both the sentences mean the same thing, or do they mean different things according to which pronoun, anyone or someone, you choose to use?

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    In this context they mean the same thing. In a different context, they would mean different things. – Andrew Sep 18 '17 at 6:12
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The difference between anyone and someone is very ambiguous.

Some of the differences are:

  1. Anyone is a Negative Polarity Item.

  2. "Someone" implies we are looking for more than one while "Anyone" implies, we are wondering if even one exists that meets the criteria.

  3. "Some" is generally replaced by "Any" in negative and interrogative contexts. But it is not as simple as that: "Some" can be used in interrogative contexts

E.g.

Does Sarah have some money?

Who has some money?

However, in your example, both can be used interchangeably

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