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I read a sentence with a structure like the following:

The painting, drawn by Leonardo Da Vinci, renowned artist of the era, is on display in our museum.

The sentence indicates that the painting that is drawn by a renowned artist Leonardo Da Vinci is placed in the museum. I had no problem understanding what it means but wondered whether it is gramatically correct.

Basically the structure goes like this

The painting, (which is) drawn by Leonardo Da Vinci, (who is) renowned artist of the era, is on display in our museum

To me, it has too much omission which makes the structure too complicated. Is this sentence gramatically correct?

Thank you

  • Is it a painting or a drawing? The description and chosen verb don't match here. – Gossar Apr 20 '18 at 20:23
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Yes the sentence is grammatically correct but without a comma after the noun phrase The painting. It should be written like this:

  • The painting drawn by Leonardo Da Vinci, who is a renowned artist of the era, is on display in our museum because The painting must be restricted by a reference since it is a common noun. As in The report that we wrote last week is lost.

  • The second clause who is a renowned artist of the era is a non-restrictive relative clause (often following a comma) which doesn't restrict a reference of the head noun, since the noun head here is a proper noun Leonardo Da Vinci, but rather elaborates information about it.

  • Removing the comma makes it sound like Da Vinci only made one painting, the one being displayed. I suspect that the restriction was done in the sentence just prior to the one quoted here. – Gossar Apr 20 '18 at 20:52

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