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I have looked through How to use "resulting" in the middle of the sentence? but still, am not sure how to use resulting in. My sentence is:

Implemented version control using GIT and JUnit for testing the application, resulting in improvement of pre-production quality and reduction of post-production defect

My question is: Is it correct? Also, can I write noun after resulting in as I have written improvement and reduction?

  • Is your sentence intended as a comment or a list item as in • implemented X using Y? – userr2684291 Sep 20 '17 at 17:52
  • I want to use as a list item in bullet. I am writing this sentence for my resume. – jParmar Sep 20 '17 at 17:53
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    The basic syntax is X resulted in Y (X caused Y), leading to X [did something], resulting in Y. In your context you've "ungrammatically" omitted the subject (I or we, I suppose) so your basic structure is We [implemented some things], resulting in [some improvements], which is fine. But it could just as well have been We [did this], which resulted in [that]. – FumbleFingers Sep 20 '17 at 18:12
  • @FumbleFingers Okay. So, is it true if I write like this? : I Implemented version control using GIT and JUnit for testing the application, resulting in improvement of pre-production quality and reduction of post-production defect. – jParmar Sep 20 '17 at 18:22
  • Yes, that's fine. Or you could use alternatives such as leading to, producing, etc. (that latter doesn't need a preposition). – FumbleFingers Sep 20 '17 at 18:36
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The verb "to result in" is a phrasal verb, which is when verbs have prepositions (or adverbs) come after them to give them a new or different meaning (examples: to take and to take off; to get and to get off)

"to result in" is essentially a mix of "to cause" and "to happen", giving it the meaning "to cause something to happen"

X did Y which resulted in Z means the same as X did Y which caused Y to happen

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