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The following sentence is copied from theverge.com:

"Tesla is reportedly working on a chip to handle all the tasks needed to power the fleet of fully self-driving cars that its CEO Elon Musk promised would be road-ready by 2019. "

I have no much idea about the subject and the verb in this sentence. It seems that there are two verbs dominate this sentence. Specially, "that its CEO Elon Musk promised would be road-ready by 2019".

In this clause, what is subject of would?

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I will break it down by sucessively removing chunks of the sentence that are not the main sentence:

"Tesla is reportedly working on a chip to handle all the tasks needed to power the fleet of fully self-driving cars that its CEO Elon Musk promised would be road-ready by 2019. "

"Tesla is reportedly working on a chip to handle all the tasks needed to power the fleet of fully self-driving cars that its CEO Elon Musk promised [things that he promised] "

"Tesla is reportedly working on a chip to handle all the tasks needed to power the fleet of fully self-driving cars that [have a particular quality] "

"Tesla is reportedly working on a chip to handle all the tasks needed to power [something] "

"Tesla is reportedly working on a chip to handle all the tasks [of some type]"

"Tesla is reportedly working on a chip [what kind of chip]"

"Tesla is [adverb] working [on something]"

"Tesla is working"

The main verb is is working.

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To build on Adam's answer: The main phrase is:

Tesla is working on a chip.

The rest of the sentence is a long adjectival phrase that describes the chip. It contains two subordinate adjectival phrases:

What is this chip?

This chip will handle all of the tasks.

What tasks?

The tasks to power the fleet of self-driving cars.

What cars?

The cars Elon Musk promised would be road-read by 2019.

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