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I'm having some confusion regarding the use of "a piece" and "apiece" for a sentence I've written for a fiction piece. Have I used "apiece" to mean "each" correctly here?

Context: I want to convey that both A and B sent a team of two each.

Both A and B would send a team of two apiece to the house where the girl was being kept. Each team would then discuss how to rescue the girl and act accordingly.

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    What did you find when you looked it up? – Davo Sep 21 '17 at 18:23
  • Usage-wise, I think using "each" is far more common (AmE anyway). – user3169 Sep 21 '17 at 19:46
  • I would use each, but I wouldn't use it there: A and B would each send a team of two to the house where the girl was being kept. Each team would then discuss how to rescue the girl and act accordingly. (Note that I intentionally dropped both) – Adam Sep 21 '17 at 21:47
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"Apiece" is the one that means "each", but it's not really necessary in your example because you already use "both". I would normally use "apiece" if it's in any way unclear how many there are or how they are divided up. If both teams send a team of two there is no ambiguity.

Here's a different example:

In the game, each of the players first puts 10 "coins" apiece into the "pot".

meaning that, however many players there are, each contributes 10 coins.

Meanwhile "a piece" means a section, bit, or segment of some whole object:

You can have a piece of pie after supper.

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