0
  1. What time does the plane arrive tomorrow?
  2. Where the plane arrives?

Or one of this sentences is incorrect? (I'm not english-speaking person).

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Sep 23 '17 at 12:27

This question came from our site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts.

3

Where the plane arrives? is incorrect: as a question this also requires . You want to say

Where does the plane arrive?

However, where the plane arrives is acceptable as a subordinate relative clause; this does not employ subject-auxiliary inversion:

Gate 17, where the plane arrives, is on the West Concourse.
Where the plane arrives will depend on the weather.
I don't know where the plane arrives

ADDED:
Edwin Ashworth points out that a relative like Where the plane arrives may actually act as either a canonical question or a declarative question in a context where it is understood as a fragment—the remainder of a full sentence from which readily inferrable matter has been omitted as superfluous:

CANONICAL QUESTION:
A: Go right on down to Gate 17.
B: Is that where the plane arrives?

DECLARATIVE QUESTION:
A: Go right on down to Gate 17.
B: And that is where the plane arrives?

Note however that neither of these expressly asks the hearer to name the location, as Where does the plane arrive? does—they ask the hearer to confirm or deny your understanding that the plane arrives at Gate 17.

  • It may be used informally as a fragment: _"Will that be Runway 2?" ... _"Where the plane arrives?" – Edwin Ashworth Sep 23 '17 at 13:03
  • @EdwinAshworth Good point--I've added that. – StoneyB Sep 23 '17 at 14:24
  • A declarative question would be 'The plane arrives at Gate 17?' This is a fragment. It could be based on either 'And that is [the gate] where the plane arrives?' or 'Is that [the gate] where the plane arrives?' – Edwin Ashworth Sep 23 '17 at 14:35
  • @EdwinAshworth I think I said that--it is a fragment acting as a canonical/declarative question. – StoneyB Sep 23 '17 at 15:07
  • I'm guessing OP's where in the second example was effectively a "typo" for when. But presumably that's also a subordinate relative clause - I'll call you when the plane arrives. – FumbleFingers Sep 23 '17 at 18:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy