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1.There is no bird park in Southeast Asia as large as Jurong Bird Park.

2.There is no other bird park in Southeast Asia as large as Jurong Bird Park.

In my opinion, sentence 1 means Jurong Bird Park may be or may not be in Southeast Asia. Sentence 2 means Jurong Bird Park is in Southeast Asia for the usage of ''other''.

I want to know your opinions.

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2 Answers 2

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We cannot doubt that Jurong Bird Park is as large as itself, no matter where it lies. We can safely assume that Jurong is a bird park.

If no bird park in Southeast Asia is as large, then Jurong must lie outside that region. If no other bird park in Southeast Asia is as large, then Jurong must lie inside that region.

However, if no bird park in Southeast Asia is larger, then we do not (from this sentence alone) know where Jurong lies. Any number of bird parks that are the same size as Jurong could exist inside Southeast Asia, just the same as any number of smaller bird parks could.

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  • Although that makes logical sense, the form "no ___ as large as X" implicitly excludes X from consideration. Here's a common example: no woman as beautiful as X.
    – Lawrence
    Sep 25, 2017 at 15:04
  • That implicit exclusion isn't present in every dialect and register, nor is it present in most of the front-page results of that search. Scholastic English traditionally and reasonably treats that construction as an error. Sep 25, 2017 at 15:23
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Both of these sentences can mean the same thing:

There are no shoes larger than these in the store.
There are no other shoes larger than these in the store.

By default, we are comparing these shoes from the store to every other shoe in the store, so you don't explicitly have to say "other". It's redundant. It's entirely possible that these shoes are from some other store, but by convention, unless you add additional information, we assume the scope is "shoes that come from this store"

Same with this example:

In the class, there is no girl taller than she is.
In the class, there is no other girl taller than she is.

She may or may not be in the class, but without additional information, we assume she is one of the students in the specified class.

When directly comparing, you do need to specify:

These shoes are larger than every other pair in the store.
She is taller than every other girl in the class.

If you want you can be unclear about the scope of the comparison:

There are no shoes larger than these.

but then, by default, the listener assumes you mean anywhere else in the world.

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