0

So there was a line in a tourism pamphlet that caught my eyes. It was like the following:

Nearby the hotel is a one of the world's largest commercial complexes where you can enjoy local foods, which are very cheap and exquisite, enjoy shopping, and more.

Looks like it wanted to say that visitors can shop, have some exquisite local foods, and enjoy more activities. I am not sure that is gramatically right though (how they write "~ and more" at the end). I have always thought "~and more" and ", etc" were for lists (of nouns). Plus, the relative clause in the sentence(which are very cheap and exquisite) only makes the sentence more complex and chaotic. I would never ever write a sentence like this in a tourism leaflet.

I want to hear your opinion about the grammar and syntax of this sentence. Thank you!

Thank you!

1

There is one grammatical error in this sentence: It should be, "one of the world's largest commercial complexes". The writer is saying that of the largest commercial complexes in the world, this is one of them. "Complexes" must be plural because if he was referring to a group of many commercial complexes, than this wouldn't be "one of the largest", it would be "the largest".

But besides that, the sentence is fine. It is perfectly acceptable to say "and more" for a group of verbs as well as for a group of nouns. "The fruit stand sells apples, oranges, and more", or "We got a lot of exercise. We were running, jumping, swimming, and more."

It's true that the phrase, "which are very cheap and exquisite" makes the sentence more complex. But there's nothing wrong with a complex sentence. I've read many sentences much more complex than this. If I was writing a book for children or people who are just learning English I might avoid that level of complexity, but for writing for fluent adults it's pretty normal.

I will say that "cheap and exquisite" are an odd pair of attributes to combine. They are not opposite, but normally we don't expect something cheap to be exquisite or vice versa.

  • Oh I must have dropped the plural form out! I was memorizing the sentence so I don't forget when I post on this forum. Thank you – MAT Sep 26 '17 at 1:19
0

The use of article a is an error. It is the redundant usage. One has already qualified the specific things of the group. So It is must eliminate the article.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.