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In this video about a 1980's British home computer, at the offset 1:14, the inventor's face appears and the voice sings:

it made a generation
who can code
a bubble before proper consoles
who all know
that the games we get today
they might be very flash
but they'll never beat the thrill of getting through Jetpac

And a link in case you're wondering what Jet pac is.

I feel like I'd understand that whole section of verse were it not for that one line.

What does "a bubble before proper consoles" mean?

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I pulled the lyrics from the Hey Hey 16K web site - having the original punctuation and layout sometimes help us understand the intent better:

It made a generation who can code
A bubble before proper consoles, who all know
That the games you get today, may be very flash
But there'll (sic) never beat the thrill
Of getting through Jetpac

At the bottom of the page the author of the lyrics writes

... it often seems to me that my adolescence in the 1980's is being wiped out of history...

So I think the definition of the noun "bubble" by Oxford Living Dictionaries of "Used to refer to a good or fortunate situation that is isolated from reality or unlikely to last." fits the best.

I would interpret the lyric to mean there was a short "golden age" before "proper consoles" came along when hobbyists produced really innovative games, but it ended rather abruptly.

It might be related to the Video game crash of 1983 as Mobeer mentioned in a comment. "Bubble" can also be used to refer to a period of very fast financial growth that collapses (a "financial" bubble). I'm not sure about this though, because the song mentions "Commodore 64" which survived the crash and "and went on to become one of the best selling computers of all time."

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A bubble in this context means that it was an isolated occurrence.
That despite the age in which it came out Jetpac was thrilling and exciting.

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