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I want to know the meaning of the bold portion, please.

Also the meaning of the "come up with" and what is subject for the bold portion.

She has seen six doctors so far but none has come up with a cause or a cure.

Reference: https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/none

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  • 2
    She has seen six doctors so far, but zero doctors have produced a cause or a cure. The "none" is itself the subject of the second clause, and the appropriate definition is the very first definition on the very page cited. And the second. And the fourth. Sep 28 '17 at 20:41
  • Did you do a google search for "define come up with"?
    – stangdon
    Sep 28 '17 at 20:44
  • yes I searched it in some dictionaries but I couldn't found which meaning is the best. Sep 28 '17 at 20:46
  • @MohsenMirzaeiFarrokhshahi - When you do a search, tell us about your search. This meta post explains why.
    – J.R.
    Sep 29 '17 at 0:24
0

The example sentence is short for:

She has seen six doctors so far but none [of them] has come up with a cause or a cure.

which is short for:

She has seen six doctors so far but [not one] [of them] has come up with a cause or a cure.

which is logically equivalent to:

She has seen six doctors so far. Each and every one of them has failed to come up with a cause or a cure.

In this context, "has come up with" means "guessed more-or-less-correctly" or "provided a useful suggestion about". When I see this phrase, I imagine one of two events:

  • A magician reaching into his "bag of tricks", and pulling something out.
  • A diver swimming in a pool, finding a coin at the bottom, and "coming up" out of the water with the coin in his hand.

As Gary Botnovcan pointed out, "none" is the subject of the highlighted clause. Alternatively, the implied "one" is the subject of the highlighted clause, and the implied "not" thoroughly negates the meaning of the clause.

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It was typed wrong by someone

What they were trying to say was: Nobody has figure out what has caused this or if there is a cure

Come up with means figured out

They said none but meant no-one

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  • This is very wrong. None is fine; it is not a typo for "no-one".
    – stangdon
    Sep 28 '17 at 21:43

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