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1."It is not always necessary,however, we use it to link two parts of that instrument".

‘However’ can be used to join two simple sentences to make a compound sentence.

But in (1) there is a mistake while using the punctuation "however", and the comma after "necesssary".

This is corrected by using semicolon and comma like this

"It is not always necessary; however, we use it to link two parts of that instrument".

This is OK to me, and I have no doubt here.

2."It is not always necessary, however, when we use it to link two parts of that instrument".

I think there are two mistakes here. The first is, using comma before necessary and the other is after conjuctive adverb a subordinate clause is used.

Here is my question. Can we use a subordinate conjunction after the conjunctive adverb?

  • Firstly, "It's not always necessary" or "It's never necessary" the original "It is always not necessary" isn't okay to my non-native ear. Next, "when" is perfectly okay after "however". You can google that like "however, when" and find many results. The comma is indeed awkward. My solution would be to place a full stop before "however". – SovereignSun Sep 29 '17 at 6:57
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No.  You cannot use "however" to join two independent clauses into a single sentence.  That word has nothing to do with how compound sentences are formed. 

 

It is very common to see transitional adverbs like "however", "therefore", "additionally" and "consequently" immediately following a semicolon.  However, that semicolon joins those clauses without any help from any word in either clause.  That's the way things work; semicolons are enough.  Additionally, such transitional adverbs are commonly found at the beginning of simple sentences such as these two.  Therefore, there is little to justify calling them conjunctive.

It is not always necessary, however, when we use it to link two parts of that instrument.

In the absence of context, there is no error in this sentence, although it might not mean what you think it means.  This "however" is a supplement of the main clause.  It carries the same meaning and has the same relationship to the main clause even if it is moved to the beginning of the sentence:

However, it is not always necessary when we use it to link two parts of that instrument.

Without context, we have no idea what the referent of each "it" might be.  We have no available antecedents for them.  They do not share their referent.  The first seems to be a semantic practice or behavior; the second a method or implement.

Having moved "however" from the middle of the sentence, we've also removed the reason for any punctuation in front of the subordinate clause.

 

Can we use a subordinating conjunction after a conjunctive adverb?  Well, no, not if there's no such thing as a conjunctive adverb.

Can we use a subordinating conjunction after a transitional adverb?  Sure.  Why not?  The sentence would need to be otherwise sound, but there is nothing that prevents that arrangement.

Does using a subordinating conjunction after a transitional adverb create a compound sentence? No. The subordinating conjunction helps create a complex sentence, no matter where or even whether a transitional adverb appears.

  • Thanks for your explanation.You said " Can we use a subordinating conjunction after a transitional adverb? Sure. Why not? " So please could you give some example sentences? – Nandy Sep 30 '17 at 3:38

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