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This is the sentence

I want to design a building for children with cancer where they could have fun and receives treatment as well.

I want to know that if it's right to use ''where'' in this position because I've seen many examples that use ''where'' after ''building''.

If it's wrong, Is there any way that I can say this sentence?

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    Your sentence is fine. Equally OK would be I want to design a building where children with cancer could have fun and receive treatment. The syntax is slightly different in that the antecedent of "where" in your first example is building for children with cancer whereas in the above it is just building. But they have the same meaning, so it's a free choice. – BillJ Oct 3 '17 at 17:01
  • The example from @BillJ is better, because the sentence posted could be ambiguous in the case of adults. "... with cancer where they could have fun ... " – Weather Vane Oct 3 '17 at 19:24
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I want to design a building for children with cancer where they could have fun and receive treatment as well.

There is nothing grammatically wrong with the sentence (note that it's receive not receives), but you should compare it to the following sentence (that someone actually said to me):

My father was a Spitfire pilot and he later developed cancer where the transmitter on his helmet touched his head.

My point is, in your sentence, it is not 100% unambiguous if the where describes the location of the building and not the location of the cancer (and all the place where I have fun, I particularly don't want to have cancer).

Consider recasting the sentence slightly:

I want to design a building for children with cancer, a place where they could have fun and receive treatment as well.

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